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Dobbin -AD 3 - History

Dobbin -AD 3 - History

Dobbin

James Cochrane Dobbin born in 1814 in Fayetteville, N.C., graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1832; was admitted to the bar in 1835; served as a Member of Congress from 1845 to 1847 and in the North Carolina legislature from 1848 to 1852. From 1853 to 1857 he was Secretary of the Navy. A firm believer in a strong Navy as insurance for peace, Secretary Dobbin instituted reforms throughout the Navy, and during his service 18 of the finest ships of their class in the world were built. Under his auspices the Perry expedition to Japan was carried to a successful termination and the treaty with that country signed. He died 4 August 1857 in Fayetteville.

(AD-3: dp. 12,450 (f.); 1. 483'10", b. 61'1", dr. 24'5"; s.
16 k; cpl 514; a 8 5", 4 3")

Dobbin (AD-3) was launched 5 May 1921 by Philadelphia Navy Yard, sponsored by Mrs. H. James granddaughter of Secretary Dobbin; and commissioned 23 July 1924, Commander D. C. gingham in command.

On 3 January 1925 Dobbin sailed for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by way of Newport, R.I., and Hampton Roads, VA., where she loaded equipment and supplies for her mission as tender to Destroyer Squadron 14, Scouting Fleet. She joined that squadron at Guantanamo Bay, and took part in gunnery practice with the destroyers. From this base, on 13 February 1925, Dobbin steamed to the Panama Canal and crossed to the Pacific Ocean. After maneuvers at sea with the Scouting Fleet she arrived at San Diego 9 March 1925 for 4 months of tender service along the west coast and at Pearl Harbor.

Dobbin returned to the east coast in July 1925 and operated in the Atlantic for the next 7 years. During this time she participated in radio experiments and continued her services to the destroyers of the Scouting Fleet. In 1932, Dobbin returned to San Diego, arriving 1 September, and operated out of that port until 5 October 1939. At that time she was transferred to Hawaii and based on Pearl Harbor.

Dobbin was moored northeast of Ford Island with five destroyers alongside, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941. Dive bombers singled out this nest, and fragments from near misses killed three men and wounded several others on board the tender. Concentrated antiaircraft fire from Dobbin and the destroyers broke up a second attack before any additional damage was done. Throughout the attack, Dobbin's boats plied the waters of the harbor, rescuing survivors from burning and sinking ships.

Dobbin served in the Hawaiian area until May 1942 when she was sent to Sydney, Australia, to provide support for ships of United States Naval Forces, Southwest Pacific there, and after 26 June 1943 at Brisbane. She served successively at Mackay, Townsville, and .Cleveland Bay, Australia, before arriving at Milne Bay New Guinea, 30 September 1943. Except for a short repair period at Sydney, Australia, in February 1944 and a 5-week stay at Manus, Admiralty Islands, during June and July 1944, Dobbin remained in the New Guinea area until 14 February 1945.

Dobbin served in Subic Bay, Luzon, from 24 February to 3 November 1945. She returned to San Diego 7 December 1945, was decommissioned 27 September 1946, and transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal 24 December 1946.

Dobbin received one battle star for World War II service.


Dobbin History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Dobbin is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Dobbin family lived in Staffordshire. This family was originally from St. Aubin, Normandy, and it is from the local form of this place-name, D'Aubin, which literally translates as from Aubin, that their surname derives. [1]

Some sources notes note that the name is a diminutive of Dobb, which itself is a pet diminutive of Robert. [2] [3]

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Early Origins of the Dobbin family

The surname Dobbin was first found in Staffordshire as a forename, Dobin de Hatton who was listed in the Assize Rolls of 1203. A few years later, Dobin Cusin was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Devon in 1221. The first record of the name as a surname was Hugo and Robert Dobin who were listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Herefordshire in 1207 and later in the Assize Rolls for Berkshire in 1227. [4]

Hugo Dobin was recorded in the Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, King John. [5]

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Early History of the Dobbin family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dobbin research. Another 92 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1539, 1674, 1641 and are included under the topic Early Dobbin History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Dobbin Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Dobbin are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Dobbin include Dobyns, Dobbins, Dobbings, Dobyn, Dobbin, Dobbyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Dobbin family (pre 1700)

Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dobbin Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dobbin family to Ireland

Some of the Dobbin family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 123 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dobbin migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Dobbin Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • George Dobbin, who arrived in Virginia in 1705 [6]
  • James Dobbin, aged 30, who landed in New York in 1799 [6]
Dobbin Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Dobbin, aged 62, who landed in New York in 1800 [6]
  • Leonard Dobbin, who landed in Alexandria, Va in 1806 [6]
  • Mrs. Dobbin, who arrived in New York, NY in 1811 [6]
  • William John Dobbin, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1812 [6]
  • William Dobbin, who arrived in New York, NY in 1817 [6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Dobbin migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Dobbin Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Michael Dobbin, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1805
  • William Dobbin, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1805
  • Johannah Dobbin, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1820
  • Mrs. Bridget Dobbin, aged 30 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Bee" departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in June 1847 [7]
  • Mr. John Dobbin who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Bee" departing from the port of Cork, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle in 1847 [7]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Dobbin migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Dobbin Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Benjamin Dobbin, aged 25, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Flora" [8]
  • Michael Dobbin, aged 19, a farm labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Gilmore"
  • Margaret Dobbin, aged 17, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Gilmore"
  • Hugh Dobbin, aged 23, a ploughman, who arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship "Escort"

Dobbin migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Dobbin Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • L. H. Dobbin, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "William and Jane" arriving in Canterbury, South Island, New Zealand on 3rd February 1857 [9]
  • Mr. Harry Dobbin (Dobbing), British settler travelling from London via Cobh aboard the ship "Sir George Pollock" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 5th September 1859 [9]
  • Mr. Charles Dobbin, (b. 1835), aged 26, Irish farm labourer from Antrim travelling from London aboard the ship "Victoria" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 30th March 1862 [9]
  • Mrs. Catherine Dobbin, (b. 1839), aged 22, Irish settler from Antrim travelling from London aboard the ship "Victoria" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 30th March 1862 [9]
  • Mr. Edward Dobbin, (b. 1857), aged 4, Irish settler from Antrim travelling from London aboard the ship "Victoria" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 30th March 1862 [9]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Dobbin (post 1700) +

  • John Dobbin (1815-1888), English landscape painter
  • Tony Dobbin (b. 1972), retired Northern Irish National Hunt jockey
  • Sir Alfred Graham Dobbin, Irish politician, Sheriff of Cork City in 1900, husband of Kate Dobbin
  • Noel Dermot Dobbin, Canadian businessman and team President of the St. John's Fog Devils of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League
  • Kate Dobbin (1868-1948), Irish landscape watercolour painter
  • James "Jim" Dobbin KSG, KMCO (1941-2014), Scottish Labour Co-operative politician and microbiologist, Member of Parliament for Heywood and Middleton (1997-2014)
  • James Cochran Dobbin (1814-1857), American politician and lawyer, 22nd United States Secretary of the Navy (1853-1857), Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from North Carolina (1845-1847)
  • Frederick James Dobbin (1879-1950), South African rugby union player, nicknamed Uncle Dobbin
  • Craig Lawrence Dobbin OC (1935-2006), Canadian industrialist and Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of CHC Helicopter Corporation
  • Mary Alice Dwyer Dobbin, American daytime television producer
  • . (Another 10 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Related Stories +

The Dobbin Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Re e merito
Motto Translation: This through merit.


Dobbins History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Norman Conquest of England in 1066 brought much change to the island nation, including many immigrants with new names. Among these immigrants were the ancestors of the Dobbins family, who lived in Staffordshire. This family was originally from St. Aubin, Normandy, and it is from the local form of this place-name, D'Aubin, which literally translates as from Aubin, that their surname derives. [1]

Some sources notes note that the name is a diminutive of Dobb, which itself is a pet diminutive of Robert. [2] [3]

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Early Origins of the Dobbins family

The surname Dobbins was first found in Staffordshire as a forename, Dobin de Hatton who was listed in the Assize Rolls of 1203. A few years later, Dobin Cusin was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Devon in 1221. The first record of the name as a surname was Hugo and Robert Dobin who were listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Herefordshire in 1207 and later in the Assize Rolls for Berkshire in 1227. [4]

Hugo Dobin was recorded in the Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, King John. [5]

Coat of Arms and Surname History Package

$24.95 $21.20

Early History of the Dobbins family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dobbins research. Another 92 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1539, 1674, 1641 and are included under the topic Early Dobbins History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Dobbins Spelling Variations

A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Dobyns, Dobbins, Dobbings, Dobyn, Dobbin, Dobbyn and many more.

Early Notables of the Dobbins family (pre 1700)

Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Dobbins Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Dobbins family to Ireland

Some of the Dobbins family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 123 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dobbins migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Dobbins Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Richard Dobbins, who settled in Virginia in 1651
  • Eleanor Dobbins, who landed in Maryland in 1651 [6]
  • Richard Dobbins, who arrived in Virginia in 1651 [6]
  • Ellen Dobbins, who arrived in Maryland in 1652 [6]
  • Rich Dobbins, who landed in Virginia in 1653 [6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Dobbins Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • William Dobbins, who arrived in America in 1760-1763 [6]
  • Thomas Dobbins, who landed in America in 1795 [6]

Dobbins migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Dobbins Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Alex Dobbins U.E. who settled in St. Stephen, New Brunswick c. 1784 member of the Port Matoon Association [7]
Dobbins Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • B. Dobbins, aged 25 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Bee" departing 17th April 1847 from Cork, Ireland the ship arrived on 12th June 1847 but they died on board [8]
  • J. Dobbins, aged 3 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Bee" departing 17th April 1847 from Cork, Ireland the ship arrived on 12th June 1847 but they died on board [8]
  • Mr. John Dobbins, aged 4 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Bee" departing 17th April 1847 from Cork, Ireland the ship arrived on 12th June 1847 but he died on board [8]

Contemporary Notables of the name Dobbins (post 1700) +

  • Georgia Dobbins (1942-2020), American singer, member of the The Marvelettes and songwriter, best known for her hit "Please Mr. Postman"
  • Daniel Dobbins (1776-1856), American sailing master in the United States Navy
  • Horace Dobbins (1868-1962), American Mayor of Pasadena, California
  • James Carter Dobbins (b. 1949), American academic, Japanologist and professor of religion and East Asian studies
  • Donald Claude Dobbins (1878-1943), U.S. Representative from Illinois
  • Samuel Atkinson Dobbins (1814-1886), American Republican Party politician
  • Bill Dobbins, American photographer
  • Timothy L. Dobbins (b. 1982), American football linebacker
  • James "Jim" Dobbins (b. 1964), Scottish former footballer
  • Dan Dobbins, American Republican politician, Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1984 [9]
  • . (Another 11 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Related Stories +

The Dobbins Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Re e merito
Motto Translation: This through merit.


Notes

This section lists frequently asked questions.

How is Dobbin different from ZODB?

There are other object databases available for Python, most notably ZODB from Zope Corporation.

  • Dobbin is written 100% in Python. The persistence layer in ZODB is written in C. ZODB also comes with support for B-Trees this is also written in C.
  • Dobbin is available on Python 3 (but requires a POSIX-system).
  • ZODB comes with support for B-Trees which allows processes to load objects on demand (because of the implicit weak reference). Dobbin currently loads all data at once and keeps it in memory.
  • Dobbin uses a persistence model that tries to share data in active objects between threads, but relies on an explicit operation to put an object in a mode that allows making changes to it. ZODB shares only inactive object data.
  • ZODB comes with ZEO, an enterprise-level network database layer which allows processes on different machines to connect to the same database.
  • ZODB comes with a memory management system that evicts object data from memory based on usage. Dobbin does not attempt to manage memory consumption, but calls upon the virtual memory manager to swap inactive object data to disk.

What is the database file format?

The default storage option writes transactions sequentially to a single file.

Each transaction consists of a number of records which consist of a Python pickle and sometimes an attached payload of data (in which case the pickle contains control information). Finally, the transaction ends with a transaction record object, also a Python pickle.

Can I connect to a single database with multiple processes?

The default storage option writes transactions to a single file, which alone makes up the storage record. Multiple processes can connect to the same file and share the same database, concurrently. No further configuration is required the database uses POSIX file-locking to ensure exclusive write-access and processes automatically stay synchronized.

How can I limit memory consumption?

To avoid memory thrashing, limit the physical memory allowance of your Python processes and make sure there is enough virtual memory available (at least the size of your database) [1].

You may want to compile Python with the --without-pymalloc flag to use native memory allocation. This may improve performance in applications that connect to large databases due to better paging.


George W. Dobbin photograph collection

The George Washington Dobbin Photograph Collection consists of 251 photographs in three boxes.

Boxes 1 and 2 consist of 240 stereoviews, the majority of which were created by George W. Dobbin. Images by other photographers are identified in the container list. There are also images taken by Langenheim Brothers of Philadelphia, R.D. Crum of New York and other photographers. Subjects include: The Patapsco River Elyville Bridge Ellicotts Mills Greenmount Cemetery, Baltimore, unidentified images of people and places, and more. There are also non-Maryland photographs including images of Italy, New York City, White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, the Delaware Water Gap from Pennsylvania and other locales. There are also two images of Charles Blondin, the first tight-rope walker to cross the Niagara Falls.

Box three contains 11 prints featuring George Dobbin, the Dobbin family, “The Lawn” and the Friday Club, a group of Baltimore lawyers organized in 1852, of which Dobbin was a member. The box also contains a short history and some sketches of the Dobbin family home, “The Lawn.”


Sales History for Dobbin Circuit, Nicholls ACT 2913

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Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: &ndash Bedrooms: &ndash Bathrooms: &ndash Ensuites: &ndash Garages: &ndash Carports: 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Dobbin of Armagh

The family of DOBBIN is of ancient standing in Ulster.

Numerous members of the family served the office of Mayor of Carrickfergus between 1571 and 1725.

About the period of the Revolution, 1690, two brothers of this family removed from Carrickfergus, County Antrim, to County Armagh, viz. THOMAS DOBBIN and ROBERT DOBBIN .

ROBERT DOBBIN (c1660-1735), settled at Tirnascobe, County Armagh and named his abode Mount Dobbin.

He and his brother held 357 acres in the townlands of Tirnascobe, Altaturk, and Rathdrumgran, all in County Armagh.

Mr Dobbin married Isabella Stewart, and had issue,

LEONARD DOBBIN (1699-1770), of Armagh, wedded Mary, daughter of Thomas Oates, and niece of General Murray (distinguished at the siege of Londonderry), and had issue,

THOMAS DOBBIN (1754-1807), espoused, in 1787, Rhoda, daughter of Robert Brown, of Kiltown, County Donegal, and had issue,

LEONARD DOBBIN (1789-1881), of the City of Armagh, Woodpark, County Armagh, and Templeport, County Cavan, Clerk of the Peace for County Armagh, married, in 1822, Mary, fourth daughter of the Rev Dr George Miller, Rector of Derryvullan, County Fermanagh, and had issue,


Our History

On June 3, 1858, in a small rented building in Faribault, Minnesota, The Rev. Dr. James Lloyd Breck established the Episcopal mission school and seminary from which Shattuck-St. Mary’s School has developed and prospered. When the school first opened, there were 45 young girls and boys and six divinity students, both Native American and white.

About this time, the newly established Episcopal diocese of Minnesota selected Henry Benjamin Whipple as its first Bishop. Bishop Whipple established his home in Faribault and, in 1860, took over the reins of the school, changing Breck’s ambitious plan for 𠇋ishop Seabury University” into something more realistic—𠇚n honest school.” 

In 1864, when Seabury Hall was completed, the school moved to its present site on the bluffs above the Straight River. With this change, the institution became a boarding school for young men and boys. In 1865, Tommy Crump, an English divinity student recently returned from the Civil War, started the boys drilling with sticks𠅊nd so began a military program that would last here for more than a century.  Bishop Whipple, c. 1864

By 1866, more room was needed and, through the largess of Dr. George Cheyne Shattuck of Boston, Shattuck Hall was built specifically for the boys. Soon the grammar school became known as “Shattuck.” That same year, Bishop Whipple opened a school for girls, St. Mary’s Hall, in his home in downtown Faribault. The girls remained there until 1872 when the Bishop moved to a new house and St. Mary’s Hall was turned over to a board of trustees. Also in 1872, the Chapel of the Good Shepherd was built through the generosity of Augusta Shumway of Chicago. Though she lost all her property in the great Chicago Fire, she kept her promise to build a chapel for “the Bishop’s boys’ school” by sending Whipple her insurance checks. With its rare, all-stone spire, it became the focal point of the Shattuck campus.

By 1883, St. Mary’s had outgrown its facilities, and a grand, ornate building, often referred to as “the Castle on the Rhine,” was built on the bluffs, less than a half mile south of Shattuck. That unique building burned in 1924, and the limestone structure that stands today was built less than a year later.

Both schools saw rapid growth during the next few years. Dr. James Dobbin, who had succeeded Dr. Breck in 1866 and who served as Rector of Shattuck School until 1914, was responsible for the construction of many beautiful limestone buildings, including the first Whipple Hall and the present Shumway Hall. In 1901, Dr. Dobbin founded St. James School for younger boys about a half mile north of Shattuck. In 1932, Seabury Theological Seminary merged with Western Theological Seminary and moved to Evanston, Illinois.

In 1972, the three schools, Shattuck, St. Mary’s and St. James, were joined into what is known today as Shattuck-St. Mary’s School. In 1974, the military program was discontinued.

In 1988, the residential and academic programs were reconfigured so that the Middle School students (grades 6-8) were at the St. Mary’s campus and the Upper School students (grades 9-12) were at the Shattuck Campus.

2003 marked the beginning of a period of growth and development for the School. The School campus physically changed with the addition of two ice arenas, the Dane Family Fieldhouse and outdoor turf field, a ropes course, a new athletic training facility, Fayfield Hall, and Kim Hall, as well as countless renovations of academic and residential buildings. Additionally, the School developed the unique Center of Excellence model that Shattuck-St. Mary’s is now known for. There are currently nine Centers of Excellence spanning across academics, athletics, and the arts. This, combined with the School’s innovative blended learning model and ScholarShift program, has made Shattuck-St. Mary’s the prominent academic institution it is today.


Sources

Dobbin Cemetery, Old Preemption Road, Waterloo, New York.

Dobbin Family records, Public Library, Waterloo, New York.

Land Transaction of Seneca County from the Public Library, Waterloo, New York.

Will of Hugh W. Dobbin filed on March 30, l853 on file in the Public Library at Waterloo, New York.

Becker, John E., "History of Village of Waterloo," Waterloo, New York, 1949, p. 51.

Sons of the American Revolution website through Ancestry.com.


History of Seneca County, New York, 1876 Early Residents of Lot 89 in Waterloo, Seneca, New York http://genealogytrails.com/ny//seneca/waterloo.html

10,000 Vital Records of Western New York, 1809-1850, page 68 for marriage of Hugh W Dobbin to Martha Sears.


Dobbin House Tavern: Historical Dining In Gettysburg

Dobbin House Tavern dates back to the 18th Century, and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Sitting along Steinwehr Avenue in Gettysburg, PA is a beautiful piece of history. Go back two centuries to experience an elegant candlelit restaurant, superb cuisine, and gracious hospitality.

Dobbin House Tavern

Long before President Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address, the Dobbin House stood as a prominent home in this historic town. Rev. Dobbin played a large role in founding Gettysburg, in 1774 he purchased 300 acres of land and began a farm, a school (liberal arts college), and place to call home for himself, his wife and their 10 children.

In my many visits to Gettysburg I have always passed by the Dobbin House, even gone on a ghost tour there, but never dined. I really had no idea what I was missing, as this is the best dining in town. Did I mention it’s kid friendly! We had two 10 year old girls with us, and they thoroughly enjoyed this colonial-era experience.

Dining at Dobbin House Tavern

The Dobbin House is open for dinner hours, beginning at 5 p.m. daily. Due to the popularity you must make an advanced reservation, as walk-ins are next to impossible. You can dine in one of six historic dining rooms, The Dining Room, Library, Parlor, Study, Spinning Room, and Bedroom (wherein you can actually dine in bed). Requests for a specific dining room can be made when you make your reservation.

You will enjoy an array of delicacies including Colonial and Continental Cuisine, prepared with the
freshest ingredients. After a full day exploring Gettysburg, we had really worked up an appetite. The menu is vast and offers salads, soups, appetizers, entrees’ and fresh dessert. I have to admit, we tried a little of everything! The also offer a very good kids menu, and not just typical “kids menu” food, everything from roast chicken to steak is on the menu for kids 10 and under.

Each meal begins with a bread service, baked fresh daily served with fresh butter. I couldn’t put the warm bread down! We began our meals with french onion soup, and a crab cake for appetizers. Both were fantastic, being a Marylander I am always cautious about crab cakes outside of Maryland, but the Dobbin House offers a delicious crab cake.

For our main course I decided on the house special, Prime Rib and my friend ordered the Gettystown Shrimp (jumbo shrimp stuffed with crab meat). The kids had the filet mignon and the pasta with tomato sauce. The portions are HUGE, and yes that includes the kids meals. Honestly, a kids meal would have fed me! The Prime Rib was so tender I could cut it with a butter knife, it was juicy and full of flavor. Our meals also came with a house salad and baked potatoes.

I have been to my share of fine dining restaurants, and The Dobbin House really ranks high on my list as one of the best. The food was fresh, cooked to perfection and full of flavor.

While we knew we shouldn’t indulge, what is a formal dinner without dessert? Offering a variety of ice cream, sorbet, Adams County Apple Pie, Pecan Pie and daily specials the choice was hard. The kids settled for ice creams, and the adults ordered the cherry cheesecake and a daily special pie. Rich, fresh and decadent, this certainly sent our meal over the top.

We were more than satisfied with our experience at The Dobbin House Tavern. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but any expectation I did have was far exceeded. I love the fact that you can bring children, and they offer a more grown and fancy menu, as our girls stated.

The next time you find yourself in Gettysburg, be sure to make a reservation at The Dobbin House Tavern. Step back in time to a by-gone era, dine by candlelight and enjoy fine dining.


Watch the video: 20 - Le secret de M. Dobbins (November 2021).