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9 January 1943

9 January 1943

9 January 1943

January 1943

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New Guinea

Allied torpedo bombers sink a Japanese cruiser off Gasmata



Collingwood was born 22 February 1889 in Cartmel, Grange-over-Sands, then in Lancashire, the son of the artist and archaeologist W. G. Collingwood, who acted as John Ruskin's private secretary in the final years of Ruskin's life. Collingwood's mother was also an artist and a talented pianist. He was educated at Rugby School and University College, Oxford, where he gained a First in Classical Moderations (Greek and Latin) in 1910 and a congratulatory First in Greats (Ancient History and Philosophy) in 1912. [4] Prior to graduation he was elected a fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

Collingwood was a fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, for some 15 years until becoming the Waynflete Professor of Metaphysical Philosophy at Magdalen College, Oxford. He was taught by the historian and archaeologist F. J. Haverfield, at the time Camden Professor of Ancient History. Important influences on Collingwood were the Italian Idealists Benedetto Croce, Giovanni Gentile and Guido de Ruggiero, the last of whom was also a close friend. Other important influences were Hegel, Kant, Giambattista Vico, F. H. Bradley and J. A. Smith.

After several years of increasingly debilitating strokes Collingwood died at Coniston, Lancashire, on 9 January 1943. He was a practising Anglican throughout his life.

Philosophy of history Edit

Collingwood is widely noted for The Idea of History (1946), which was collated from various sources soon after his death by a student, T. M. Knox. It came to be a major inspiration for philosophy of history in the English-speaking world and is extensively cited, leading to an ironic remark by commentator Louis Mink that Collingwood is coming to be "the best known neglected thinker of our time". [5]

Collingwood categorized history as a science, defining a science as "any organized body of knowledge." [6] However, he distinguished history from natural sciences because the concerns of these two branches are different: natural sciences are concerned with the physical world while history, in its most common usage, is concerned with social sciences and human affairs. [7] Collingwood pointed out a fundamental difference between knowing things in the present (or in the natural sciences) and knowing history. To come to know things in the present or about things in the natural sciences, "real" things can be observed, as they are in existence or that have substance right now.

Since the internal thought processes of historical persons cannot be perceived with the physical senses and past historical events cannot be directly observed, history must be methodologically different from natural sciences. History, being a study of the human mind, is interested in the thoughts and motivations of the actors in history. Therefore, Collingwood suggested that a historian must "reconstruct" history by using "historical imagination" to "re-enact" the thought processes of historical persons based on information and evidence from historical sources. Re-enactment of thought refers to the idea that the historian can access not only a thought process similar to that of the historical actor, but the actual thought process itself. Consider Collingwood's words regarding the study of Plato:

"In its immediacy, as an actual experience of his own, Plato's argument must undoubtedly have grown up out of a discussion of some sort, though I do not know what it was, and been closely connected with such a discussion. Yet if I not only read his argument but understand it, follow it in my own mind by re-arguing it with and for myself, the process of argument which I go through is not a process resembling Plato's, it actually is Plato's, so far as I understand him rightly." [8]

In Collingwood's understanding, a thought is a single entity accessible to the public and therefore, regardless of how many people have the same thought, it is still a singular thought. "Thoughts, in other words, are to be distinguished on the basis of purely qualitative criteria, and if there are two people entertaining the (qualitatively) same thought, there is (numerically) only one thought since there is only one propositional content." [9] Therefore, if historians follow the correct line of inquiry in response to a historical source and reason correctly, they can arrive at the same thought the author of their source had and, in so doing, "re-enact" that thought.

Collingwood rejected what he deemed "scissors-and-paste history" in which the historian rejects a statement recorded by their subject either because it contradicts another historical statement or because it contradicts the historian's own understanding of the world. As he states in Principles of History, sometimes a historian will encounter "a story which he simply cannot believe, a story characteristic, perhaps, of the superstitions or prejudices of the author's time or the circle in which he lived, but not credible to a more enlightened age, and therefore to be omitted." [10] This, Collingwood argues, is an unacceptable way to do history. Sources which make claims that do not align with current understandings of the world were still created by rational humans who had reason for creating them. Therefore, these sources are valuable and ought to be investigated further in order to get at the historical context in which they were created and for what reason.

Philosophy of art Edit

The Principles of Art (1938) comprises Collingwood's most developed treatment of aesthetic questions. Collingwood held (following Benedetto Croce) that works of art are essentially expressions of emotion. For Collingwood, an important social role for artists is to clarify and articulate emotions from their community.

Collingwood developed a position later known as aesthetic expressivism (not to be confused with various other views typically called expressivism), a thesis first developed by Croce. [11]

Political philosophy Edit

In politics Collingwood defended the ideals of what he called liberalism "in its Continental sense":

The essence of this conception is . the idea of a community as governing itself by fostering the free expression of all political opinions that take shape within it, and finding some means of reducing this multiplicity of opinions to a unity. [12]

In his Autobiography, Collingwood confessed that his politics had always been "democratic" and "liberal", and shared Guido de Ruggiero's opinion that socialism had rendered a great service to liberalism by pointing out the shortcomings of laissez-faire economics. [13]

Collingwood was not just a philosopher of history but also a practising historian and archaeologist. He was, during his time, a leading authority on Roman Britain: he spent his term time at Oxford teaching philosophy but devoted his long vacations to archaeology.

He began work along Hadrian's Wall. The family home was at Coniston in the Lake District and his father was a leading figure in the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological Society. Collingwood was drawn in on a number of excavations and put forward the theory that Hadrian's Wall was not so much a fighting platform but an elevated sentry walk. [14] He also put forward the suggestion that Hadrian's defensive system also included a number of forts along the Cumberland coast.

He was very active in the 1930 Wall Pilgrimage for which he prepared the ninth edition of Bruce's Handbook.

His final and most controversial excavation in Cumbria was that of a circular ring ditch near Penrith known as King Arthur's Round Table in 1937. It appeared to be a Neolithic henge monument, and Collingwood's excavations, failing to find conclusive evidence of Neolithic activity, nevertheless found the base of two stone pillars, a possible cremation trench and some post holes. Sadly, his subsequent ill health prevented him undertaking a second season so the work was handed over to the German prehistorian Gerhard Bersu, who queried some of Collingwood's findings. However, recently, Grace Simpson, the daughter of the excavator F. G. Simpson, has queried Bersu's work and largely rehabilitated Collingwood as an excavator. [15]

He also began what was to be the major work of his archaeological career, preparing a corpus of the Roman Inscriptions of Britain, which involved travelling all over Britain to see the inscriptions and draw them he eventually prepared drawings of nearly 900 inscriptions. It was finally published in 1965 by his student R. P. Wright.

He also published two major archaeological works. The first, somewhat surprisingly for a philosopher was The Archaeology of Roman Britain, a handbook in sixteen chapters covering first the archaeological sites (fortresses, towns and temples and portable antiquities) inscriptions, coins, pottery and brooches. Mortimer Wheeler in a review, [16] remarked that "it seemed at first a trifle off beat that he should immerse himself in so much museum-like detail . but I felt sure that this was incidental to his primary mission to organise his own thinking".

However, his most important work was his contribution to the first volume of the Oxford History of England, Roman Britain and the English Settlements, of which he wrote the major part, Nowell Myres adding the second smaller part on English settlements. The book was in many ways revolutionary for it set out to write the story of Roman Britain from an archaeological rather than a historical viewpoint, putting into practice his own belief in 'Question and Answer' archaeology.

The result was alluring and influential. However, as Ian Richmond wrote, 'The general reader may discover too late that it has one major defect. It does not sufficiently distinguish between objective and subjective and combines both in a subtle and apparently objective presentation'. [17]

The most notorious passage is that on Romano-British art: "the impression that constantly haunts the archaeologist, like a bad smell, is that of an ugliness that plagues the place like a London fog". [18]

Collingwood’s most important contribution to British archaeology was his insistence on Question and Answer archaeology: excavations should not take place unless there is a question to be answered. It is a philosophy which, as Anthony Birley points out, [19] has been incorporated by English Heritage into the conditions for Scheduled Monuments Consent. Still, it has always been surprising that the proponents of the "new" archaeology in the 1960s and the 70s have entirely ignored the work of Collingwood, the one major archaeologist who was also a major professional philosopher. He has been described as an early proponent of archaeological theory. [20]

Outside archaeology and philosophy, he also published the travel book The First Mate's Log of a Voyage to Greece (1940), an account of a yachting voyage in the Mediterranean, in the company of several of his students.

Arthur Ransome was a family friend, and learned to sail in their boat, subsequently teaching his sibling's children to sail. Ransome loosely based the Swallows in Swallows and Amazons series on his sibling's children.

Main works published in his lifetime Edit

  • Religion and Philosophy (1916) ISBN1-85506-317-4[21]
  • Roman Britain (1923 2nd ed., 1932) 0-8196-1160-3[22][23]
  • Speculum Mentis or The Map of Knowledge (1924) 978-1-897406-42-7[24]
  • Outlines of a Philosophy of Art (1925) [25]
  • The Archaeology of Roman Britain (1930) 978-0-09-185045-6[26]
  • An Essay on Philosophical Method (1933, rev. ed. 2005). 1-85506-392-1[27]
  • Roman Britain and the English Settlements (with J. N. L. Myres, 1936, 2nd ed. 1937) [18]
  • The Principles of Art (1938) 0-19-500209-1[28]
  • An Autobiography (1939) 0-19-824694-3[29]
  • The First Mate's Log (1940) [30]
  • An Essay on Metaphysics (1940, revised edition 1998). 0-8191-3315-9[31]
  • The New Leviathan (1942, rev. ed. 1992) 0-19-823880-0[32]

Main articles published in his lifetime Edit

Published posthumously Edit

  • The Idea of Nature (1945) 0-19-500217-2[33]
  • The Idea of History (1946, revised edition 1993). 0-19-285306-6[34]
  • Essays in the Philosophy of Art (1964) [35]
  • Essays in the Philosophy of History (1965) 0-8240-6355-4[36]
  • Essays in Political Philosophy (with David Boucher) (1989) 0-19-823566-6[37]
  • The Principles of History and Other Writings in Philosophy of History (ed. William H. Dray and W. J. van der Dussen) (2001) 0-19-924315-8[38]
  • The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology (2005) 0-19-926253-5[39]

All 'revised' editions comprise the original text plus a new introduction and extensive additional material.


World War II Today: January 9

1940
German bombers sink three merchantmen in North Sea.

Australian Comforts Fund reestablished, for women to send care packages to soldiers.

The British submarine Starfish was sunk in the Heligoland Bight by German minesweeper trawlers.

1941
The Avro Manchester III makes its first flight equipped with four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines in place of the two Rolls-Royce Vultures used on earlier marks. Ordered into production as the Lancaster, it becomes possibly the most famous RAF bomber of all time, after bearing the brunt of the Bomber Command offensive in Europe.

British & Australian troops surround Italians at Tobruk, Libya.

Hitler held a conference with his generals to discuss plans to attack the Soviet Union. Hitler said that German success in Russia would encourage Japan to attack the United States, thus keeping the Americans too occupied to get involved in the war in Europe.

1942
Japanese troops launch an attack against the eastern side of the Santa Rosa-Natib defence line on Bataan, making some gains, although US-Filipino counter-attacks forces them back to their start-line.

Soviets begin offensive at Moscow and Smolensk (Battle of the Valdai Hills).

In Malaya, British begin withdrawal into Johore to protect Singapore.

The Battle of Dražgoše began between the Slovene Partisans and Nazi occupying forces.

The British destroyer HMS Vimiera struck a naval mine and sank in the Thames Estuary.

Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto made a statement to Taketora Ogata that may have been the basis for the apocryphal sleeping giant quote attributed to him when he said, “A military man can scarcely pride himself on having ‘smitten a sleeping enemy’ it is more a matter of shame, simply, for the one smitten. I would rather you made your appraisal after seeing what the enemy does, since it is certain that, angered and outraged, he will soon launch a determined counterattack.”

1943
Soviet planes drop leaflets on the surrounded Germans in Stalingrad requesting their surrender with humane terms. The Germans refuse.

Italian destroyer Corsaro sank off the coast of Tunisia after hitting a mine.

First flight of prototype Lockheed C-69 Constellation, fastest US transport plane of war.

1944
Countess Ciano escapes to Switzerland and is interned.

British forces take Maungdaw, Burma, a critical port for Allied supplies.

Flight nurses and medics from the 807th Medical Air Evacuation Transport Squadron who crash-landed in Albania arrive in Italy after two months behind enemy lines.


Russian Army Repels Hitler's Forces: August 1942-January 1943

On January 18, 1943, the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto fought back for the first time after realizing "resettlement" is a charade. Learn about this and the other important World War II events that occurred during the month of January 1943 below.

World War II Timeline: January 14-January 21

January 14: The British Royal Air Force (RAF) raids Nazi German U-boat ports at Lorient and Cherbourg in occupied France.

January 14-24: The Allied leadership meets in Casablanca, Morocco, to strategize the next phase of the global war. First priority is assigned to the defeat of the U-boats. In addition, Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill announce publicly that they will demand the unconditional surrender of the Axis countries.

January 15: Acting on assurances from Hermann Göring, Adolf Hitler calls for the daily delivery of 300 tons of supplies to the trapped Sixth Army in Stalingrad. While 300 tons would meet the needs of the men on the ground, it is far beyond what the Luftwaffe can accomplish.

January 16: For the first time in months, the RAF bombs Berlin.

January 18: After two and a half years, the siege of Leningrad comes to an end. With some 20,000 civilian deaths a day, relief has come too late for many of the city's residents.

The Nazi German army fields its new weapon, the Mark VI Tiger heavy tank, in a battle on the outskirts of the Tunisian capital of Tunis.

Realizing that the Nazi German concept of "resettlement" is a charade designed to lead them quietly to their deaths, the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto fight back for the first time.

January 21: Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president of the World Jewish Congress in New York, receives a telegram from prisoners in the Warsaw Ghetto. They plead for aid and say, in part, that they are "poised at the brink of . . . annihilation" and that they "live with the awareness that in the most terrible days of our history you did not come to our aid."

World War II Headlines

Below are more highlights and images that outline the events of World War II, such as FBI raids and important military leaders of the war.

Tanaka Raizo's claims to fame: Rear Admiral Tanaka Raizo was the leading tactical commander of Japanese destroyer forces during the war. His finest hour came during the Battle of Tassafaronga off Guadalcanal on November 30, 1942, when his eight destroyers were ambushed by U.S. warships. Heavily outgunned, Tanaka sank one American cruiser and damaged three others with "Long Lance" torpedoes, while losing only a single destroyer. Tanaka also gained fame for his tenacious effort to resupply Japanese troops on Guadalcanal via the so-called "Tokyo Express." He was exiled to a shore command in 1943 because of his criticism of Japanese strategy and tactics in the Solomons.

Plotters and predictors of the Women's Auxiliary Territorial Service: Seen at work is a plotter with the Women's Auxiliary Territorial Service, the women's branch of the British Army, in which women served in many capacities normally allocated to men. Working in Britain, plotters used radar to collect data about incoming enemy aircraft. Meanwhile, predictors stood on rooftops looking for planes. Together, their information was used to direct antiaircraft fire, vector fighter planes toward the Nazi German intruders, and alert the public to air raids.

Erich von Manstein, successful leader and supporter of Nazi party:Generalfeldmarschall Erich von Manstein devised the Sichelschnitt (sickle-cut) plan that allowed troops to move past France's Maginot Line in 1940. Sent into the Soviet Union in late 1942 to rescue the trapped Sixth Army, Manstein fought through blizzards to within 30 miles of Stalingrad on December 19 before being stopped by the Red Army. Put in charge of Army Group South, Manstein halted the Red Army offensive and went on to capture Kharkov. A strong supporter of the Nazi Party, he accepted huge bribes from Adolf Hitler. However, the Führer relieved him of command in 1944.

FBI adds sabotage and espionage to its list of duties: In 1936, as the Fascist movement gained momentum in Nazi Germany and the threat of war grew stronger in Europe, President Franklin Roosevelt believed that America would soon become a target for seditious activities. The role of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was expanded to include the investigation of those types of treasonable schemes. In 1939 the FBI's responsibilities were again expanded to include sabotage and espionage investigations. Raiding homes of suspected subversives proved fruitful in the bureau's fight against terrorism in the states.

Americans listen in on Japanese shortwave radio: An NBC technician mans a listening post in North Hollywood, California, monitoring shortwave radio broadcasts from the Far East. Numerous listening posts were maintained by American press associations, broadcasters, and government agencies -- such as the Federal Communications Commission -- to monitor foreign broadcasts. Though such broadcasts tended to be heavily laced with propaganda, they also provided clues about enemy intentions, policy changes, and other useful information.

In our final section, we'll cover the key World War II events that occurred during the end of January 1943.

Learn more about the significant events and players of World War II in these informative articles:

The effectiveness of the Japanese military during the war was seriously diminished by the dissension -- even outright hostility -- between the Imperial Army and Imperial Navy. This conflict was rooted in a history of fierce competition for funding, endless battles for political influence, a fundamental difference in worldview, and disagreement on strategic policy.

Some Japanese naval officers tended to be more cosmopolitan in outlook, while most of the Army remained provincial and deeply conservative. Militarily, the Navy placed strategic emphasis on Southeast Asia, while the Army focused almost exclusively on China and the Soviet Union.

The Japanese command structure exacerbated interservice squabbling by allowing the two services to function as antagonistic equals. No authoritative joint command structure existed. Nor was there a meaningful recourse to a higher authority or method for resolving interservice differences.

The result was an almost pathological mutual mistrust. The services consistently failed to pool information, coordinate operations, or cooperate on the battlefield. With few exceptions, they did not share research, supplies, material, or resources, even when faced with disaster.

Squabbles could descend to astonishing pettiness. At the Mitsubishi factory at Nagoya, locked doors were put in place to conceal each service's contract work from the other. On a more serious level, some Army officers were not informed about the extent of the 1942 naval catastrophe at Midway until as late as 1945.

The outcome of this fratricidal relationship was inescapable: an impaired war effort and the speedier defeat of both services.


You were born on a Friday

January 29, 1943 was the 4th Friday of that year. It was also the 29th day and 1st month of 1943 in the Georgian calendar. The next time you can reuse 1943 calendar will be in 2021. Both calendars will be exactly the same.

There are left before your next birthday. Your 79th birthday will be on a Saturday and a birthday after that will be on a Sunday. The timer below is a countdown clock to your next birthday. It’s always accurate and is automatically updated.

Your next birthday is on a Saturday


The Ghetto

Shortly after the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, German authorities began to concentrate Poland’s population of over three million Jews into several extremely crowded ghettos located in the larger Polish cities. The largest of these, the Warsaw Ghetto, confined over 300,000 people into a densely packed area of central Warsaw that was little more than 1 square mile. Many of the people had no housing at all and those that did were crowded in at about nine people per room. In November 1940 the Ghetto was sealed off with barbed wire, brick walls and armed guards – anyone caught leaving would be shot on sight. Even before mass deportations from the Ghetto to Treblinka extermination camp began, Nazis controlled the amount of food that was brought into the Ghetto so disease (particularly typhus) and starvation were rampant, killing thousands each month.

Transportation to Treblinka

Mass deportations to Treblinka first began in July 1942 under the secretive Grossaktion Warschau operation. Under the plans German SS major Hermann Höfle, the Nazi’s ‘Resettlement Commissioner’, informed the Ghetto Jewish Council’s leader, Adam Czerniaków, that he would require 7,000 Jews a day for ‘resettlement to the East’ – the people of the Ghetto were told that they were being transported to work camps, but in reality they were being ‘resettled’ to Treblinka extermination camp. Once he became aware of the true goal of the ‘resettlement’ plan, Czerniaków committed suicide.

At first, members of the Jewish resistance movement decided not to challenge the SS directives, believing that the Jews were being sent to labour camps. However, during the Grossaktion, Jews began being terrorised via daily round-ups where they were marched through the ghetto and assembled at the Umschlagplatz station for this so-called ‘resettlement’. It soon became apparent that they were actually being sent to their deaths aboard overcrowded Holocaust trains. Once the Ghetto inhabitants became aware that the deportations were part of an extermination process, many of the remaining Jews decided to revolt. In those first two months some 265,000 Jews were deported from the Warsaw Ghetto to Treblinka and more than 20,000 others were sent to forced labour camps or died during the deportation process.

Armed resistance

The first armed resistance in the Ghetto occurred in January 1943. Small groups of survivors had started to form underground self-defence units such as the left wing ŻOB (Żydowska Organizacja Bojowa: Jewish Combat Organisation) and right wing ŻZW (Żydowski Związek Wojskowy: Jewish Military Union). On 9 January 1943 chief of the SS Heinrich Himmler visited the Warsaw Ghetto and ordered the deportation of another 8,000 Jews. The January deportations caught the Jews by surprise, but whilst Jewish families hid in bunkers, fighters of the ŻZW joined by elements of the ŻOB had been making preparations to resist since the autumn. On 18 January 1943 the Nazis entered the Ghetto to begin a second wave of deportation but were ambushed by a ŻOB unit. Fighting lasted several days before the Germans withdrew. Although both the ŻOB and ŻZW suffered heavy losses, the deportation was halted within a few days and suspended for the next few months.

Uprising

The two resistance organisations, ŻOB and ŻZW took control of the Ghetto, building fighting posts, executing a number of Nazi collaborators and even establishing a prison to hold traitors. Hundreds of people in the Ghetto prepared themselves to fight, arming themselves (albeit sparsely) with handguns, gasoline bottles and the few other weapons that had been smuggled into the Ghetto by resistance fighters.

On 19 April 1943, on the eve of Passover, Himmler sent in SS forces and their collaborators with tanks and heavy artillery to liquidate the Warsaw Ghetto. Himmler launched the attack as a special operation in honour of Hitler’s birthday on April 20. As they went in the Germans were ambushed by Jewish insurgents firing pistols, handguns and one machine gun and tossing hand grenades and Molotov cocktails from alleyways, windows and sewers. Despite being outnumbered, hundreds of resistance fighters armed with a small cache of weapons managed to fight the Germans for almost a month. The Germans had planned to liquidate the ghetto within three days.

When the German’s ultimatum to surrender was rejected by the resistance fighters, the forces resorted to systemically burning houses in the Ghetto block by block. By 16 May the Ghetto was firmly back under Nazi control and one that day, the Germans blew up Warsaw’s Great Synagogue in a symbolic act. It is estimated that up to 13,000 Jews died during the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising around half of them were burned alive, suffocated or died from smoke inhalation. Of the remaining 50,000 residents, most were captured and shipped to concentration and extermination camps. It is not known how many German casualties there were but it is thought to have been less than 300.


9 January 1943 - History

Kentucky - 43 (Head Coach: Adolph Rupp)

PlayerFGFTFTAPFPts
Milt Ticco712215
Mulford Davis11113
Paul Noel11213
Melvin Brewer33629
Ed Lander20024
Ken Rollins20214
Marvin Akers20034
Clyde Parker01141
Bill Barlow00010
Totals 18 7 14 17 43

Xavier - 38 (Head Coach: Clem Crowe)

PlayerFGFTFTAPFPts
Tom Barry30206
Lin Sahlfeld23407
John Tetens03433
John O'Hara00110
Robert Kruer00000
Fred Geraci00000
Stan Ense31147
Robert Mulligan22326
Mel Heywood41429
Harry Trainor00000
Totals 14 10 19 12 38

Kentucky teammates collide for the ball


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October 30th, 1959 is a Friday. It is the 303rd day of the year, and in the 44th week of the year (assuming each week starts on a Monday), or the 4th quarter of the year. There are 31 days in this month. 1959 is not a leap year, so there are 365 days in this year. The short form for this date used in the United States is 10/30/1959, and almost everywhere else in the world it's 30/10/1959.

This site provides an online date calculator to help you find the difference in the number of days between any two calendar dates. Simply enter the start and end date to calculate the duration of any event. You can also use this tool to determine how many days have passed since your birthday, or measure the amount of time until your baby's due date. The calculations use the Gregorian calendar, which was created in 1582 and later adopted in 1752 by Britain and the eastern part of what is now the United States. For best results, use dates after 1752 or verify any data if you are doing genealogy research. Historical calendars have many variations, including the ancient Roman calendar and the Julian calendar. Leap years are used to match the calendar year with the astronomical year. If you're trying to figure out the date that occurs in X days from today, switch to the Days From Now calculator instead.


September 24th, 1943 is a Friday. It is the 267th day of the year, and in the 38th week of the year (assuming each week starts on a Monday), or the 3rd quarter of the year. There are 30 days in this month. 1943 is not a leap year, so there are 365 days in this year. The short form for this date used in the United States is 9/24/1943, and almost everywhere else in the world it's 24/9/1943.

This site provides an online date calculator to help you find the difference in the number of days between any two calendar dates. Simply enter the start and end date to calculate the duration of any event. You can also use this tool to determine how many days have passed since your birthday, or measure the amount of time until your baby's due date. The calculations use the Gregorian calendar, which was created in 1582 and later adopted in 1752 by Britain and the eastern part of what is now the United States. For best results, use dates after 1752 or verify any data if you are doing genealogy research. Historical calendars have many variations, including the ancient Roman calendar and the Julian calendar. Leap years are used to match the calendar year with the astronomical year. If you're trying to figure out the date that occurs in X days from today, switch to the Days From Now calculator instead.


May 21st, 1943 is a Friday. It is the 141st day of the year, and in the 20th week of the year (assuming each week starts on a Monday), or the 2nd quarter of the year. There are 31 days in this month. 1943 is not a leap year, so there are 365 days in this year. The short form for this date used in the United States is 5/21/1943, and almost everywhere else in the world it's 21/5/1943.

This site provides an online date calculator to help you find the difference in the number of days between any two calendar dates. Simply enter the start and end date to calculate the duration of any event. You can also use this tool to determine how many days have passed since your birthday, or measure the amount of time until your baby's due date. The calculations use the Gregorian calendar, which was created in 1582 and later adopted in 1752 by Britain and the eastern part of what is now the United States. For best results, use dates after 1752 or verify any data if you are doing genealogy research. Historical calendars have many variations, including the ancient Roman calendar and the Julian calendar. Leap years are used to match the calendar year with the astronomical year. If you're trying to figure out the date that occurs in X days from today, switch to the Days From Now calculator instead.