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Galatea SP-714 - History

Galatea SP-714 - History


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Galatea II

(SP-714: t. 367 (gross); 1. 192'; b. 2i'; dr. 9', s. 14 k.,
cpl. 57; a. 3 3" )

The second Galatea was a fresh water yacht built in 1914 by Pusey and Jones of Wilmington, Del.; purchased by the Navy 14 July 1917 at Detroit from E. L. Ford, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich., and commissioned at Detroit 25 August 1917, Lt. Comdr. O. T. McClurg, USNRF, in command.

Galatea departed Detroit 25 August 1917 for the Boston Navy Yard where she decommissioned 26 September for conversion to an armed patrol craft. She recommissioned 16 November 1917, Lt. H. D. Hinckley, USCG, in command. Next proceeding to Philadelphia, she sailed from there for the Azores 15 December 1917 with French Submarine Chaser 314 in tow.

Proceeding by way of Bermuda, Galatea arrived Ponta Delgada, Azores, 22 January 1918, racked and strained by the towing of the submarine chaser. Damage required repairs until May of 1919 when she began service as an interisland transport in the Azores. She carried the American Consul from Ponta Delgada for official calls on the governors of Horta, Fayal and Angra, Terceira returning to her base in time to honor Navy Seaplane No-5 on 10 May, and Navy Seaplane NG-4 on 20 May, as they arrived in Ponta Delgada on the historic first transoceanic flight.

Galatea departed Ponta Delgada 7 June 1919 for Boston, Mass., where she decommissioned 15 July. The following year she was towed to the Portsmouth Navy Yard, N.H., to serve us receiving ship for submarine crews She was sold at Portsmouth 20 December 1921 to Captain A. A. Tanos of New York City.


Triumph of Galatea

The water nymph, whose affair with a peasant shepherd inspired numerous works of art.

Ovid, in his Metamorphoses, tells the story of the mortal peasant shepherd, Acis, who falls in love with Galatea, a Nereid or water nymph, whose Greek name translates as ‘she who is milk white’. The jealous Cyclops, Polyphemus, bludgeoned Acis with a boulder and, in response, a distraught Galatea transformed him into the Sicilian river that bears his name. Their tale has inspired numerous works of art, including Handel’s pastoral opera of 1718, Acis and Galatea, with a libretto by John Gay, and paintings by Lorrain and Poussin.

Raphael’s Triumph of Galatea, a fresco created around 1512 for the Villa Farnesina in Rome, depicts a scene later in the Nereid’s life, when Galatea stands triumphant in a shell chariot pulled along by dolphins. To the left, a Triton, half-man and half-fish, abducts a sea nymph, while another sounds a shell trumpet. The work is inspired by La Giostra (‘the Carousel’), a work by the poet Poliziano, who was tutor to the Medici, the ruling family of Florence, and one of the great pan European intellectuals of the age. He had begun to write La Giostra in honour of Giuliano de’ Medici’s victory in a tournament in 1475. He abandoned it three years later, following the conspiracy by the Pazzi family, which attempted to oust the Medici as rulers of Florence, during which Giuliano was stabbed to death during High Mass in the city’s Duomo. Poliziano saved the life of Giuliano’s brother, Lorenzo, by locking him in the Cathedral’s sacristy.

Raphael’s fresco was commissioned for the Villa Farnesina by Agostino Chigi, a hugely wealthy Sienese banker, who was treasurer to Pope Julius II. He had the villa built in Rome’s Trastevere area by Baldassarre Peruzzi between 1506 and 1510. It was acquired in 1577 by the Farnese family, whose members included Pope Paul III and Elisabeth Farnese, who became Queen of Spain in the early 18th century. The building, whose principal attraction remains Raphael’s fresco, is open to the public.


Galatea SP-714 - History

This page covers World War I era acquired vessels numbered in the "SP" and "ID" series from SP-700 through SP-799, plus some that were given numbers but not acquired.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual ships and craft numbered in the "SP" and "ID" series from SP-700 through SP-799.

If the "SP"/"ID" vessel you want does not have an active link on this page, or the other pages of this series, and the statement "no image available" is lacking, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

World War I era acquired vessels numbered from SP-700 through SP-799:

  • SP-700 : Lydonia . 497 gross ton steam yacht, 1912. USN: Lydonia , 1917-1919
  • SP-701 : Dixie III . 54.1 foot motor boat, 1911. USN: Dixie III (renamed SP-701 , 1918), 1917-1919
  • SP-702 : Pomander . 43-foot motor boat, 1916. USN: Pomander , 1917-1918
  • SP-703 : Caprice . 45' 10" motor boat, 1914. USN: Caprice , 1917-1919
  • SP-704 : Barbara . 15 gross ton motor boat, 1910. USN: Barbara , 1917-1919. No image is available, or known to exist
  • SP-705 : Lexington II . 27 gross ton motor boat, 1911. USN: Lexington II (renamed SP-705 , 1918), 1917-1918. No image available
  • SP-706 : Nirvana . 40-foot motor boat, 1915. Also named Tarpon II . USN: Nirvana (renamed SP-706 , 1918), 1917-1919
  • SP-707 : Endion . 61 gross ton motor boat, 1898. USN: Endion , 1917-1921
  • SP-708 : Elsie III . 52-foot motor boat, 1912. USN: Elsie III , 1917-1919


USS Margaret (SP-527)

Figure 4: USS Margaret (SP-527) crewman throwing a heaving line to a French submarine chaser, preparatory to taking her in tow enroute from Newport, Rhode Island, to Bermuda in November 1917. Officer second from left is Margaret's Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Frank Jack Fletcher. Fletcher went on to become one of the great American admirals of World War II. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 7: US Navy converted yachts and other small ships enroute from Bermuda to the Azores, November 1917. Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527) by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 8: USS Cythera (SP-575) preparing to take USS Margaret (SP-527) in tow during their passage from Bermuda to the Azores in November 1917. She towed Margaret for thirteen of the seventeen days of this voyage. Another converted yacht is visible in the center distance. Photographed from on board Margaret by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 9: USS Wenonah (SP-165) steams through heavy seas while enroute from Bermuda to the Azores in November 1917. Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527) by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 10: USS Wenonah (SP-165) seen from USS Margaret (SP-527) while steaming through heavy seas enroute from Bermuda to the Azores, November 1917. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 11: US Navy converted yachts and other small ships enroute from Bermuda to the Azores in November 1917. The converted yacht in the center appears to be USS Wenonah (SP-165). Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527) by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 12: USS Margaret (SP-527) upon arrival at Ponta Delgada, Azores, in December 1917, after seventeen days' passage from Bermuda. Note the worn condition of her paint. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 13: USS Margaret (SP-527) at Horta, Fayal, Azores, in December 1917. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 14: USS Margaret (SP-527) dressed with flags for George Washington's birthday, while anchored off Horta, Fayal, Azores, on 22 February 1918. Mount Pico is in the distance. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 15: USS K-6 (Submarine No. 37) coming alongside USS Margaret (SP-527) at Horta, Fayal, Azores, in December 1917. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 16: USS K-6 (Submarine No. 37) at Horta, Fayal, Azores, in December 1917. This photograph gives you a good idea of how small American submarines were during World War I. Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527) by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 17: The American gunboat USS Galatea (SP-714) at Ponta Delgada, Azores, in February 1918. Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527). Note Galatea's camouflage. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 18: USS Caldwell (Destroyer No. 69) taking on fuel oil from the French four-masted barque Quevilley, at Ponta Delgada, Azores, 27 February 1918. Caldwell appears to be painted in a Mackay low-visibility camouflage pattern. Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527) by Raymond D. Borden. Quevilley was one of the world's few sailing oil tankers. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 19: USS Tonopah (Monitor No. 8) in the harbor at Ponta Delgada, Azores, in April 1918. She is painted in what appears to be Mackay-type camouflage. Photographed from USS Margaret (SP-527) by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 20: Ship's officers and crew posed on board USS Margaret (SP-527) while she was at Ponta Delgada, Azores, in February 1918. Lieutenant Commander Frank Jack Fletcher, her commanding officer, is in the center of the second row. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 21: USS Margaret ’s (SP-527) original officers, circa October 1917. Lieutenant Commander Frank Jack Fletcher, her commanding officer, is in the center. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 22: Ship's officers stand by her binnacle, while USS Margaret (SP-527) was at Ponta Delgada, Azores, circa December 1917. Lieutenant Commander Frank Jack Fletcher, her commanding officer, is in the center. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 23: USS Margaret ’s (SP-527) Number Two (after) 3-inch gun and its crew, circa 1917-1918. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 24: Watertender "Jack" (or "Pop") Dalton, USN , wearing his medals on board USS Margaret (SP-527), circa 1917-1918. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 25: USS Margaret ’s (SP-527) commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Frank Jack Fletcher (standing in Margaret's gig), leaving his ship to take command of a destroyer, at Ponta Delgada, Azores, 1 March 1918. Photographed by Raymond D. Borden. Note camouflage pattern on the ship in the left background. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Tuesday, July 17, 2012

USS Tacoma (PG-92)

Figure 1: USS Tacoma (PG-92), date and place unknown. US Navy photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 2: USS Tacoma (PG-92), date and place unknown. Photograph courtesy of Terry Eccleston, GMCS(SW), USNR, Patrol Gunboat Association, and Terry W. McManuels, ETCM(SW), Retired. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 3: USS Tacoma (PG-92), right, coming up astern of USS Canon (PG-90) , date and place unknown. US Navy photograph from the November 1972 edition of All Hands Magazine. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 4: Cutaway drawing of an Asheville class patrol gunboat . Click on diagram for larger image.

Figure 5: USS Tacoma (PG-92), date and place unknown. US Navy photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 6: USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Crockett (PG-88) , in Dry Dock 6, Ship Repair Facility at Yokosuka, Japan, circa January or February 1969. This picture gives you an idea of the difference in size between an Asheville class patrol gunboat and a battleship. Photograph by YN3 Clark Pickard, aboard Crockett. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 7: USS Tacoma (PG-92) after she was transferred to Colombia in 1983 and renamed ARC ( Armada de la República de Colombia ) Quitasueño (P 112). Photograph courtesy of Lieutenant (r) Luis Bernardo Castro Villegas. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 8: ARC Quitasueño (P 112) in July 1998 after she was transferred from the Colombian Navy to the Colombian Coast Guard. Photograph courtesy of Capitan de Corbeta, Phinio Alberto Garcia Garavito, Columbian Navy, via Patrol Gunboat Association, Terry W. McManuels, ETCM(SW), Retired. Click on photograph for larger image.

Figure 9: ARC Quitasueño (P 112) as she looks today at the Naval Base ARC Bolivar, Colombia, Main Pier, Sector E. The photograph is dated 8 June 2012. Photograph courtesy of Lieutenant Luis B. Castro (r), Colombian Navy . Click on photograph for larger image.


Galatea


("Pygmalion and Galatea" by Laurent Pêcheux, 1784)

Galatea is a short stand-alone story and normally I wouldn&apost have bothered with it. However! This is a story by Madeline Miller we&aposre talking about here, author of the brilliant novels Circe and The Song of Achilles. I will read anything and everything she writes. This might just be a short story but it too is brilliant. Galatea is a woman whose husband is a sculptor and who is sculpted by him into the perfect woman. Afterwards, a goddess brings
("Pygmalion and Galatea" by Laurent Pêcheux, 1784)

Galatea is a short stand-alone story and normally I wouldn't have bothered with it. However! This is a story by Madeline Miller we're talking about here, author of the brilliant novels Circe and The Song of Achilles. I will read anything and everything she writes. This might just be a short story but it too is brilliant. Galatea is a woman whose husband is a sculptor and who is sculpted by him into the perfect woman. Afterwards, a goddess brings her to life.. Galatea's husband keeps her captive, wanting to keep her as she is. to preserve this woman he sees as a possession, this woman who embodies his idea of the perfect woman. He seeks to control her in every way, body and mind. However, Galatea does not truly belong to him and cannot fully be contained and controlled. The story is an examination of society's idea of a perfect woman and the objectification of women. It might be brief, but it is powerful. Madeline Miller has such a gift with words, with creating real characters you immediately care about and identify with. 5 stars, though I wish I could give it more. It is a beautiful story that feels like a song. . more

"Haven&apost you ever touched a statue?"

A short, troubling story of a woman sculpted of stone, who is treated with disdain & cruelty by her creator.

"Why cannot I find a maiden such as this for my wife? Why must such perfection by marble & not flesh?"

The moral of the tale, even if you think a woman has a heart of stone, don&apost assume this to be the case. She could surprise you. And don&apost think she won&apost have her revenge.

Shout out to Aqsa! Seeing this on Aqsa&aposs "to read" list caught my eye (or I&aposd neve "Haven't you ever touched a statue?"

A short, troubling story of a woman sculpted of stone, who is treated with disdain & cruelty by her creator.

"Why cannot I find a maiden such as this for my wife? Why must such perfection by marble & not flesh?"

The moral of the tale, even if you think a woman has a heart of stone, don't assume this to be the case. She could surprise you. And don't think she won't have her revenge.

Shout out to Aqsa! Seeing this on Aqsa's "to read" list caught my eye (or I'd never have heard of this gem).

A very short story of Galatea and Pygmalion. And in this retelling Paphos is a girl.

I wish it was longer. Anyway, the author always is so good in words. ♥️♥️♥️

Beautiful, horrifying, powerful

A story of such beauty and economy it left me breathless and stunned and yes, gratified in its conclusion. The power of her words to create a fully living woman was like the power of the sculptor to create the fully realized woman, Galatea. The goddess has gifted the author with the power of words, a power Madeline Miller uses to connect our world to the ancient world as if no time had passed at all.

This is definitely a sad retelling of Galatea&aposs mythological tale. Carved and sculpted by Pygmalion, Galatea — a beautiful ivory statue — is brought to life by the goddess Aphrodite in light of the sculptor&aposs prayer. In Miller&aposs version, we see how Galatea is given a voice, independent to that of her abusive and overbearing husband. However, Pygmalion, as blind as he is, only sees her as an object of desire — someone that can be dominated and controlled. In order to save her daughter, she concoc

This is definitely a sad retelling of Galatea's mythological tale. Carved and sculpted by Pygmalion, Galatea — a beautiful ivory statue — is brought to life by the goddess Aphrodite in light of the sculptor's prayer. In Miller's version, we see how Galatea is given a voice, independent to that of her abusive and overbearing husband. However, Pygmalion, as blind as he is, only sees her as an object of desire — someone that can be dominated and controlled. In order to save her daughter, she concocts a plan that would break their chains from the innumerable torment.

Beautifully told, Miller injects impressive imagery and adapts the ancient tale to question the ideology of "beauty" and the "ideal woman" that is reminiscent of modern society. As we dive deeper, it also parallels women's collective experiences in a patriarchal society, all with its triumphs and failures, the path to overcome all odds and challenge the status quo, and finally, bring forth light in the midst of unspeakable darkness. . more

I never liked the story of Galatea. No, that isn&apost true, actually. I liked the story but not the guy in it.

You see, what kind of man creates the perfect woman out of marble, obsessed with purity and perfection because real-life women have shunted or betrayed him (according to his statement, we never meet them)?!
A weak man, that&aposs who.
Pygmalion is a pig, let&aposs face it. It&aposs why he wanted to create the perfect, virginal, obedient thing for his own pleasure. The problem is that a goddess of all "p I never liked the story of Galatea. No, that isn't true, actually. I liked the story but not the guy in it.

You see, what kind of man creates the perfect woman out of marble, obsessed with purity and perfection because real-life women have shunted or betrayed him (according to his statement, we never meet them)?!
A weak man, that's who.
Pygmalion is a pig, let's face it. It's why he wanted to create the perfect, virginal, obedient thing for his own pleasure. The problem is that a goddess of all "people" helped him by bringing the statue to life.

This is the statue's, Galatea's, story from her point of view.

Madeline Miller really has a great way of bringing to life this ancient setting and weaving the myths we know and have read with her own thoughts, filling in the blanks, sometimes changing a few details in the process.

I very much loved this version, Galatea and her daughter, and suffered with Galatea through the ordeals brought on not only by her monstrous husband but also the other horrible people who were helping him.

The writing was once again enchanting but also not too oblique, the story itself a feminist take on yet another Greek myth penned by male authors who are so quick to tell you of tragic heroes suffering by the hands of wicked women - but the author still never demonizes men in general as so many feminists do (which drives me just as mad).

So much better than the other short story of hers I read today - might be because of how much I have thought about this myth in the past as opposed to the other.

Sadly, this short story doesn't seem to be available in print anywhere, but if you can, make sure to get your hands on it (you'll get the pun after having read the story). . more

This incredibly short little story tells the Pygmalion myth from the POV of the statue, Galatea. What happens when the sculptor realises that by making his fantasy flesh, he has made her human? She is independent. She has thoughts, feelings and idea of her own. What happens when he realises she has her own will? And what will he do when he realises that their child is equally independent? And what will Galatea do to save herself and her daughter?

Another wonderful retelling of classic Greek myth This incredibly short little story tells the Pygmalion myth from the POV of the statue, Galatea. What happens when the sculptor realises that by making his fantasy flesh, he has made her human? She is independent. She has thoughts, feelings and idea of her own. What happens when he realises she has her own will? And what will he do when he realises that their child is equally independent? And what will Galatea do to save herself and her daughter?

Another wonderful retelling of classic Greek myth from Madeline Miller. I wish they would price these Kindle Singles a little cheaper, but this is definitely worth it for fans of classic myths and legends. . more

Madeline Miller provided an interesting take on the myth of Galatea, which involved an ivory statue of that name, depicting its creator&aposs ideal female form. Galatea comes to life and is provided autonomy by the gods, and as her creator longs for the softness of her flesh, he dually desires her as prone and as mute as the statue she originated from.

I found this an interesting little read and, as with all of Miller&aposs work, appreciated the feminist ideologies and insight to patriarchal society that Madeline Miller provided an interesting take on the myth of Galatea, which involved an ivory statue of that name, depicting its creator's ideal female form. Galatea comes to life and is provided autonomy by the gods, and as her creator longs for the softness of her flesh, he dually desires her as prone and as mute as the statue she originated from.

I found this an interesting little read and, as with all of Miller's work, appreciated the feminist ideologies and insight to patriarchal society that lay beneath the words. I did also, however, find it too short to remain entirely as impactful as her longer works have been for me, but this is one I am still glad to have experienced. . more

Genre: Fiction (Mythology Retelling)
Type: Short Story
POV: First Person - Female
Rating:

There was once a sculptor in ancient Greece who was repulsed by the women of his town and decided he would make the woman of his dream. Blessed by a goddess, his masterpiece, Galatea came alive. But instead of a perfectly obedient wife, she had a mind of her own so he locked her away. With the love of her daughter in mind, she would do anything to grant them the freedom they deserved.

Genre: Fiction (Mythology Retelling)
Type: Short Story
POV: First Person - Female
Rating:

There was once a sculptor in ancient Greece who was repulsed by the women of his town and decided he would make the woman of his dream. Blessed by a goddess, his masterpiece, Galatea came alive. But instead of a perfectly obedient wife, she had a mind of her own so he locked her away. With the love of her daughter in mind, she would do anything to grant them the freedom they deserved.

Galatea is a short story with a darker interpretation of the tale of Pygmalion and Galatea from classical Greek mythology. It chronicles Galatea's life 11 years after her transformation. I like how the author explored the period and gave it her own twist. My only wish is for it to be longer.

For more reviews/reveals/giveaways visit:

. more

Galatea is a statue made human and what follows is a short novella of her life and her end.

The writing was beautiful and I didn’t expect to get sucked in for only 20 pages.

Now to fall down the rabbit hole of all her other books.

Galatea is a super short retelling featuring the myth of Pygmalion and Galatea.

Brief myth summary: Pygmalion was a sculptor who avoided and scorned all women based on his revulsion towards the local prostitutes. As such, he invested himself completely into creating the perfect woman out of ivory. He ended up falling deeply in love with this female form made of stone. After witnessing Pygmalion&aposs devotion, Aphrodite: Goddess of Love gave life to the statue who was named Galatea. Pygmalion and Gal Galatea is a super short retelling featuring the myth of Pygmalion and Galatea.

Brief myth summary: Pygmalion was a sculptor who avoided and scorned all women based on his revulsion towards the local prostitutes. As such, he invested himself completely into creating the perfect woman out of ivory. He ended up falling deeply in love with this female form made of stone. After witnessing Pygmalion's devotion, Aphrodite: Goddess of Love gave life to the statue who was named Galatea. Pygmalion and Galatea married and had a son: Paphos. (Use your favorite search engine for more details.)

In Madeline Miller's retelling, she removes the glow of myth off this story and reveals its bare bones. Misogyny, ownership, power imbalance, abuse. Through Galatea's POV, readers feel the effects of it all and then watch as she problem solves how best to protect her children, who are female in this retelling. Although I wish this story was longer, it communicated its message beautifully. Check it out.

My favorite quote:
“Naturally, when he wished me to live, that’s what he wanted still, only warm so that he might fuck me. But it does seem foolish that he didn’t think it through, how I could not both live and still be a statue. I have only been born for eleven years, and even I know that.” . more

I have been so hungry for more from Madeline Miller, the fantastic author of Circe and The Song of Achilles. Hopefully we won’t have to wait another five years for her next novel, but in the mean time I’ve been hunting for an ebook version of this short story, Galatea. If you have as well, I found it on Hoopla with my local library log-in.

The titular character is a figure from Greek mythology who was carved from ivory stone by Pygmalion, a sculptor from Cyprus. Galatea then comes to life and eve I have been so hungry for more from Madeline Miller, the fantastic author of Circe and The Song of Achilles. Hopefully we won’t have to wait another five years for her next novel, but in the mean time I’ve been hunting for an ebook version of this short story, Galatea. If you have as well, I found it on Hoopla with my local library log-in.

The titular character is a figure from Greek mythology who was carved from ivory stone by Pygmalion, a sculptor from Cyprus. Galatea then comes to life and eventually bears a daughter, Paphus. This story doesn’t provide all of that information, but it’s not necessary to understand what’s happening. If you liked Circe you’ll like Galatea, both the characters and the stories. Though her story is much shorter, many of the themes echo one another and in the end you’re left with the same vengeful triumph. . more

Ahoy there me mateys! I read circe in 2019 and really enjoyed it so I wanted to give this short story a try. Luckily a local library had a copy. For those who don&apost recognize the title, it is a Greek myth where a sculptor (and king), Pygmalion, falls in love with his statue of a beautiful woman and asks the gods to bring her to life.

The versions that I knew always professed that the sculptor and his transformed wife live happily ever after. This short story is nothing like that. The "origin Ahoy there me mateys! I read circe in 2019 and really enjoyed it so I wanted to give this short story a try. Luckily a local library had a copy. For those who don't recognize the title, it is a Greek myth where a sculptor (and king), Pygmalion, falls in love with his statue of a beautiful woman and asks the gods to bring her to life.

The versions that I knew always professed that the sculptor and his transformed wife live happily ever after. This short story is nothing like that. The "original" Ovid tale had Pygmalion swear off all women after seeing prostitutes and being repulsed by them. It always seemed to me like Pygmalion thought all women were unworthy of his status and that he was a bit of an egotistical bastard. He didn't want a women until it was one he created exactly the way he wanted her. This version gives the statue a point of view. It ain't pretty.

The story is well written - enough that the circumstances of Galatea's life are just plain gross. Galatea's husband is a disgusting, horrible person who basically tortures his wife. He wanted a woman based on his ideals of obedience and virginity and didn't expect his transformed wife to have the ability to speak. Much less have thoughts of her own.

I have to say that for me this is not a five-star read merely because I didn't like reading about Galatea's circumstances. While the sex scenes are not graphic, how Galatea is treated made me kinda sickened and rather upset. I did think some of the oddities of how a statue would think were cool. The ending and how Galatea ends up ultimately dealing with her husband was gratifying but I didn't have fun with this one. The author was very successful at making her point though. Ick.

I am glad this story was free from the library as this 20 page story is listed for $3.99 on Amazon. While I am glad I read it, it would not worth paying that price point to read it (for me at least). Arrrr!

Side note: I never realized how much resonance this myth had in terms of influencing other stories! There is a huge list of paintings, poems, short stories, operas, plays, comics, etc. that deal with this myth. The majority by men of course. . more


یواس‌اس گالاتی (اس‌پی-۷۱۴)

یواس‌اس گالاتی (اس‌پی-۷۱۴) (به انگلیسی: USS Galatea (SP-714) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن 192' بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۱۴ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس گالاتی (اس‌پی-۷۱۴)
پیشینه
مالک
تکمیل ساخت: ۱۹۱۴
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: 367 tons
درازا: 192'
پهنا: 24'
آبخور: 9'
سرعت: 14 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Galatea

While Galatea is framed as an interactive fiction piece, the system shares many qualities with the long line of "chatterbots," going back to Joseph Weizenbaum's mid-1960s Eliza. Conversation with Galatea is not as free as with Eliza but can unfold in more interesting ways as the topic, Galatea's mood, and the history of conversation progress. The results of different discussions can sometimes even lead the user to uncover different stories that, while consistent within themselves, suggest different possible worlds.

Mac: Download and install Spatterlight if you do not already have a z-machine interpreter. Download and unzip Galatea.zip and open the resulting file Galatea.z8 in your interpreter.

Windows: Download and install Gargoyle if you do not already have a z-machine interpreter. Download and unzip Galatea.zip and open the resulting file Galatea.z8 in your interpreter.

Author description: You come around a corner, away from the noise of the opening. There is only one exhibit. She stands in the spotlight, with her back to you: a sweep of pale hair on paler skin, a column of emerald silk that ends in a pool at her feet. She might be the model in a perfume ad the trophy wife at a formal gathering one of the guests at this very opening, standing on an empty pedestal in some ironic act of artistic deconstruction &mdash You hesitate, about to turn away. Her hand balls into a fist. "They told me you were coming." An interactive conversation with Pygmalion's statue come to life, allowing the interactor to pursue different information or seek different relationships with the title character. Galatea won the 2000 IF Art Show and a XYZZY award for Best Non-Player Character.

Instructions: Type commands to the main character at the ">" prompt and press enter. Input can take the form of imperatives such as "look," "examine the pedestal," or "touch" followed by some object. The most important commands in Galatea are those that pertain to conversation, which include "ask about" followed by a topic (abbreviated to "a") and "tell about" a topic (abbreviated to "t"). These commands steer the subject of the conversation. The best approach is to follow up on a word or idea that Galatea has herself used, or to talk about objects present in the room. Other important verbs are "think about" followed by a topic to recall a previous topic, and "recap" to review the topics previously discussed.


Origins

Barnegat fitted out at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y., and was detailed, on 20 November 1917, to accompany the armed yacht Nokomis (Id. No. 609) to the Azores, towing submarine chasers. Despatch traffic, however, indicates difficulties in finding certain items of equipment to be installed on board, the Commander, Naval Station, New York, informing the Navy Department that Barnegat and Montauk (Id.No.1213) still needed binnacles and standard compasses as of 11 December, but prognosticated that both ships would be ready to sail on the 12th. Barnegat ultimately departed New York for the Philadelphia Navy Yard, there to complete preparations “for distant service” and thence to await onward routing.


Barnegat—with the French submarine chaser SC-171 in tow—departed the Delaware capes on 22 December 1917, bound for Bermuda, as part of a small flotilla of armed tugs and yachts ordered to deliver six submarine chasers built in American shipyards to the French government. Venetia (Id.No. 431), the flagship for the convoy, towed SC-67, Lydonia (Id. No. 700), SC-173 Montauk, SC-29, and Gypsum Queen (Id. No. 430), SC-170 and SC-172. One day out, on the afternoon of 23 December, Lydonia reported boiler trouble. Consequently, Comdr. Louis B. Porterfield, the group’s commanding officer, ordered Montauk to release SC 29 and to take Lydonia and her charge, SC-173, astern, and directed Barnegat to pick up SC 29. While Venetia stood by, her starboard whaleboat ready to assist the tug if necessary, Barnegat’s sailors got the towline on board the French craft at 1600. Then, as Montauk and her disabled charge returned toward Norfolk, the little flotilla again set course for Bermuda.


During the mid watch on Christmas Day, however, Barnegat and her tows dropped so far astern of the convoy that Venetia, with SC-67 still riding at the end of the towline astern, began searching for them. Hailing Gypsum Queen close at hand on her port beam, Venetia signaled to “stay close…and keep in sight.” A less than a half hour into the morning watch, at 0425, Venetia spotted a light on her starboard bow and began steering toward it. No sooner had the convoy flagship made contact with her one prodigal, but Gypsum Queen, that had fallen astern during the search for Barnegat, dropped below the horizon.


Barnegat soon informed Venetia of her difficulties, promising to be ready to proceed in about two hours. Eventually, by 0945 on Christmas Day, the tug was underway and steaming slowly by the midpoint in the morning watch, the convoy was on course and together again, with Venetia’s log containing the notation that she was steaming various courses and various speeds “to keep in touch with the tugs.”


The little convoy reached Bermuda shortly before the start of the mid watch on 27 December, with Barnegat bringing up the rear a strong northeasterly wind and nearly continuous rain made the reception chilly and damp, but eventually all of the ships and their tows were safely anchored in Great Sound. Barnegat then shifted to His Majesty’s Dockyard, Bermuda, on the afternoon of the 29th. Barnegat’s executive officer visited Venetia on the morning of the 31st presumably the topic of conversation was voyage repairs, for that afternoon the “exec” returned to the ship with an officer from Prometheus (Repair Ship No. 2). On New Year’s Day, 1918, Ensign John Alexander, USNRF, was detached from Venetia with orders to command Barnegat.


Venetia later transferred foodstuffs to Barnegat via Prometheus’s motor sailer on 5 January, the day that the tug quit the dockyard to anchor in Great Sound. More conferences between commanding officers ensued, probably dealing with the next leg of the voyage, that commenced as the flotilla took departure on 7 January 1918 for the Azores. Forming a line of divisions with Venetia in the lead, again towing SC-67 Nokomis and Galatea (SP-714) followed, as did Penobscot (Id. No. 982), Nahant (Id. No. 1250) and Concord (Id. No.773) Barnegat and Gypsum Queen brought up the rear.


By the time that Barnegat reached Punta Delgada, Azores, in late January, plans were being broached for her future employment. Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in European Waters, suggested to the Chief of Naval Operations that the majority of vessels assigned to the western bases be tugs. Consequently, he contemplated sending, about 25 January, Barnegat (among other vessels) to the French coast to base at Brest.

She left the dockyard on 5 January and the flotilla sortied for the Azores two days later. The convoy reached Punta Delgada late in the month, and Barnegat operated in and around that island group into the spring. Highlights of her Azores duty were a run to Horta, Fayal, to tow French submarine chaser SC 28 to Punta Delgada and a cruise in nearby waters to search for the troopship Hancock. Barnegat, with Gypsum Queen and two French subchasers, cleared the Azores early in the spring and proceeded to France. Upon their arrival at Brest on 23 April 1918, Barnegat and Gypsum Queen were assigned to Division 9, Patrol Force.


Barnegat operated with that organization through the Armistice, towing vessels that ranged from lighters to battleships and transports. Continuing to operate out of Brest after the fighting ended, she added work as a dispatch vessel and as a passenger ferry to her duties as a tug. Toward the end of her service in Europe, she embarked a party of motion picture photographers on 7 August to film the gigantic transport Leviathan.


Barnegat got underway on 24 September 1919 in company with Bella (Id. No. 2211) and Nahant, bound for the Azores. However, less than 24 hours out, she accidentally rammed and holed Nahant. Then she and Bella stood by their damaged consort until they escorted her back to Brest.


While she waited for Nahant to complete repairs, Barnegat conducted harbor operations through the first fortnight of October. The same trio again left French waters on 15 October. After a brief stop at Punta Delgada, they encountered heavy seas and gale-force winds. Experiencing engine difficulties in the predawn darkness of 3 November, the tug radioed her plight to Bella and bridled her bow for towing. Nahant passed a hawser to the tug and Barnegat remained under tow until late the next afternoon when she was again able to proceed under her own power. A few days later, Nahant suffered propulsion difficulties and Barnegat closely accompanied her to Bermuda. They got underway once more on 24 November and reached Norfolk four days later.


The second ship to be so named by the U.S. Navy, Galatea was a fresh water yacht built in 1914 by Pusey and Jones of Wilmington, Delaware purchased by the Navy 14 July 1917 at Detroit, Michigan, from E. L. Ford, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan, and commissioned at Detroit 25 August 1917, Lt. Comdr. O. T. McClurg, USNRF, in command.

Galatea departed Detroit 25 August 1917 for the Boston Navy Yard where she decommissioned 26 September for conversion to an armed patrol craft. She recommissioned 16 November 1917, Lt. H. D. Hinckley, USCG, in command. Next proceeding to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, she sailed from there for the Azores 15 December 1917 with French Submarine Chaser 314 in tow.

Proceeding by way of Bermuda, Galatea arrived Ponta Delgada, Azores, 22 January 1918, racked and strained by the towing of the submarine chaser. Damage required repairs until May 1919 when she began service as an interisland transport in the Azores.

She carried the American Consul from Ponta Delgada for official calls on the governors of Horta, Fayal and Angra, Terceira, returning to her base in time to honor Navy Seaplane NC-3 on 19 May, and Navy Seaplane NC-4 on 20 May, as they arrived in Ponta Delgada on the historic first transoceanic flight.


Watch the video: Greek Mythology: Story of Pygmalion and Galatea (June 2022).


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